Social web

fall 2011

 

Overview

 

This course is designed to

  1. -Introduce students to the theoretical aspects of how online communities operate

  2. -Help students identify those characteristics that make social websites succeed or fail

  3. -Research selected topics in social web

  4. -Develop students' critical thinking and writing, and presentation skills


This course will be taught as a reading class, meaning that students are expected to do reading assignments before each class, and to actively participate in discussion. Each week one student, the "Lecturer", will be responsible for presenting the course topic to the rest of the class, and to lead a discussion on this topic. This student will be responsible for kick-starting an online discussion on this topic, which should begin at least 72 hours before the lecture. The rest of the students are expected to contribute to this discussion before the day of the lecture by writing a critique of the material and preparing questions for the class. In addition, each student must adopt a social website of their choosing, become active members in it, and at the end of term present to the rest of the class an empirical account of how this website works.

 

Contact

schedule

Lectures are every Thursday 2-4 pm, Room 6, labs are every Friday 2-4pm, Room 6.


Announcements

Details about installing R and necessary packages have been posted on the forum


Location of lecture classes has changes to room 6


The reading material has been updated. Read through the material and develop at least 1-2 project ideas. Post these on the forum and comment on others’ ideas. Prepare a 5 minute presentation of your ideas for next Thursday 28th Oct.

Course material

- Introduction to Social web [pdf]

- Assessment form for student lectures [pdf]

  1. -The online forum is here

  2. -Template for all reports [.doc]

Prerequisites

This course requires English reading and writing skills, some knowledge of mathematics, and familiarity with casual Internet use. There is no textbook for this course. All reading material will be given by the instructor.

Grading and exams

There is no exam for this course. Individual components will be weighted as follows (this is tentative and subject to change):

  1. -Lecture(s): 20%

  2. -Classroom & online participation: 20%

  3. -Term project: 60%

Lectures

Each student will sign up to deliver lectures on the topics we will be covering. Each week one student will give their lecture. This student must prepare PowerPoint or KeyNote slides to use as helping material for their lecture. If you are a lecturer, then you must post your critique and questions 72 hours before your lecture, so that the rest of the students can respond and we can have a discussion prior to the lecture.

On the day of your lecture, you will present a 45-60 minute presentation. This will be followed by a quick 10 minute question-and-answer session in order to clarify any outstanding details relating to your presentation. We will then have a 15 minute break, followed by a 90 minute discussion session which you must lead. In this session we can discuss any issue that you want to put forward, as well as any questions that the rest of the students have asked online.

Your lecture will be evaluated on how well you describe the concepts, the breadth and depth of the topics you cover, and the overall impact of your delivery. Ideally you should present material beyond the reading list. Your discussion session will be assessed on the quality of topics you raise for discussion, and the quality of answers you give to students' questions.

Inevitably, some topics will be more difficult than others, and this will be taken into consideration.

Classroom and online participation


Each student will sign up to deliver lectures on the topics we will be covering. Each week one student will give their lecture. This student must prepare PowerPoint or KeyNote slides to use as helping material for their lecture. If you are a lecturer, then you must post your critique and questions 72 hours before your lecture, so that the rest of the students can respond and we can have a discussion prior to the lecture.

On the day of your lecture, you will present a 45-60 minute presentation. This will be followed by a quick 10 minute question-and-answer session in order to clarify any outstanding details relating to your presentation. We will then have a 15 minute break, followed by a 90 minute discussion session which you must lead. In this session we can discuss any issue that you want to put forward, as well as any questions that the rest of the students have asked online.

Your lecture will be evaluated on how well you describe the concepts, the breadth and depth of the topics you cover, and the overall impact of your delivery. Ideally you should present material beyond the reading list. Your discussion session will be assessed on the quality of topics you raise for discussion, and the quality of answers you give to students' questions.

Inevitably, some topics will be more difficult than others, and this will be taken into consideration.